Saturday, November 10, 2012

Hebrews 7:25

New International Version (©1984)
Therefore he is able to save completely those who come to God through him, because he always lives to intercede for them.

New Living Translation (©2007)
Therefore he is able, once and forever, to save those who come to God through him. He lives forever to intercede with God on their behalf.

English Standard Version (©2001)
Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them.

New American Standard Bible (©1995)
Therefore He is able also to save forever those who draw near to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them.

King James Bible (Cambridge Ed.)
Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

International Standard Version (©2008)
Therefore, because he always lives to intercede for them, he is able to save completely those who come to God through him.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English (©2010)
And he can give life for eternity to those who come near to God by him, for he lives always and offers prayers for our sakes.

GOD'S WORD® Translation (©1995)
That is why he is always able to save those who come to God through him. He can do this because he always lives and intercedes for them.

King James 2000 Bible (©2003)
Therefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever lives to make intercession for them.

American King James Version
Why he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come to God by him, seeing he ever lives to make intercession for them.

American Standard Version
Wherefore also he is able to save to the uttermost them that draw near unto God through him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Whereby he is able also to save for ever them that come to God by him; always living to make intercession for us.

Darby Bible Translation
Whence also he is able to save completely those who approach by him to God, always living to intercede for them.

English Revised Version
Wherefore also he is able to save to the uttermost them that draw near unto God through him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

Webster's Bible Translation
Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come to God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

Weymouth New Testament
Hence too He is able to save to the uttermost those who come to God through Him, seeing that He ever lives to plead for them.

World English Bible
Therefore he is also able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, seeing that he lives forever to make intercession for them.

Young's Literal Translation
whence also he is able to save to the very end, those coming through him unto God -- ever living to make intercession for them.

Barnes' Notes on the Bible
Wherefore he is able also - As he ever lives, and ever intercedes, he has power to save. He does not begin the work of salvation, and then relinquish it by reason of death, but he lives on as long as it is necessary that anything should be done for the salvation of his people. We need a Saviour who has power, and Christ has shown that he has all the power which is needful to rescue man from eternal death.

To the uttermost - This does not mean simply "forever" - but that he has power to save them so that their salvation shall be "complete" - εἰς τὸ παντελὲς eis to panteles. He does not abandon the work midway; he does not begin a work which he is unable to finish. He can aid us as long as we need anything done for our salvation; he can save all who will entrust their salvation to his hands.

That come unto God by him - In his name; or depending on him. To come to God, is to approach him for pardon and salvation.

Seeing he ever liveth - He does not die as the Jewish priests did.

To make intercession for them - see the note at Romans 8:34. He constantly presents the merits of his death as a reason why we should be saved. The precise mode, however, in which he makes intercession in heaven for his people is not revealed. The general meaning is, that he undertakes their cause, and assists them in overcoming their foes and in their endeavors to live a holy life; compare 1 John 2:1. He does in heaven whatever is necessary to obtain for us grace and strength; secures the aid which we need against our foes; and is the pledge or security for us that the law shall be honored, and the justice and truth of God maintained, though we are saved. It is reasonable to presume that this is somehow by the presentation of the merits of his great sacrifice, and that that is the ground on which all this grace is obtained. As that is infinite, we need not fear that it will ever be exhausted.

Clarke's Commentary on the Bible
Wherefore - Because he is an everlasting priest, and has offered the only available sacrifice, he is able to save, from the power, guilt, nature, and punishment of sin, to the uttermost, εις το παντελες, to all intents, degrees, and purposes; and always, and in and through all times, places, and circumstances; for all this is implied in the original word: but in and through all times seems to be the particular meaning here, because of what follows, he ever liveth to make intercession for them; this depends on the perpetuity of his priesthood, and the continuance of his mediatorial office. As Jesus was the Lamb of God slain from the foundation of the world, has an everlasting priesthood, and is a continual intercessor; it is in virtue of this that all who were saved from the foundation of the world were saved through him, and all that shall be saved to the end of the world will be saved through him. He ever was and ever will be the High Priest, Sacrifice, Intercessor, and Mediator of the human race. All successive generations of men are equally interested in him, and may claim the same privileges. But none can be saved by his grace that do not come unto God through him; i.e. imploring mercy through him as their sacrifice and atonement; confidently trusting that God can be just, and yet the justifier of them who thus come to him, believing on Christ Jesus.

The phrase εντυγχανειν τινι, to make intercession for a person, has a considerable latitude of meaning. It signifies,

1. To come to or meet a person on any cause whatever.

2. To intercede, pray for, or entreat in the behalf of, another.

3. To defend or vindicate a person.

4. To commend.

5. To furnish any kind of assistance or help.

6. And, with the preposition κατα, against, to accuse, or act against another in a judicial way.

"The nature of the apostle's arguments," says Dr. Macknight, "requires that, by Christ's always living, we understand his always living in the body; for it is thus that he is an affectionate and sympathizing High Priest, who, in his intercession, pleads the merit of his death to procure the salvation of all who come unto God through him. Agreeably to this account of Christ's intercession, the apostle, in Hebrews 7:27, mentions the sacrifice of himself, which Christ offered for the sins of the people as the foundation of his intercession. Now, as he offered that sacrifice in heaven, Hebrews 8:2, Hebrews 8:3, by presenting his crucified body there, (See Hebrews 8:5), and as he continually resides there in the body, some of the ancients were of opinion that his continual intercession consists in the continual presentation of his humanity before his Father, because it is a continual declaration of his earnest desire of the salvation of men, and of his having, in obedience to his Father's will, made himself flesh, and suffered death to accomplish it. See Romans 8:34 (note), note 3. This opinion is confirmed by the manner in which the Jewish high priest made intercession for the people on the day of atonement, and which was a type of Christ's intercession in heaven. He made it, not by offering of prayers for them in the most holy place, but by sprinkling the blood of the sacrifices on the mercy-seat, in token of their death. And as, by that action, he opened the earthly holy places to the prayers and worship of the Israelites during the ensuing year; so Jesus, by presenting his humanity continually before the presence of his Father, opens heaven to the prayers of his people in the present life, and to their persons after the resurrection."

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible
Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost,.... Because he continues ever, and has an unchangeable priesthood. This is to be understood not of temporal salvation, nor of providential favours, but of spiritual and eternal salvation; and includes a deliverance from all evil, here and hereafter, and an enjoyment of all good in this world, and in that to come: Christ was called to this work by his Father; he was promised by him to do it, and was sent by him to effect it, and has accomplished it; and this is the reason of his name Jesus, and was the end of his coming into this world, and which the Gospel always represents as such: this work required ability; here was a law to be fulfilled; justice to be satisfied; sin to be bore, removed, and atoned for; many enemies to engage with, and a cursed death to undergo: it was a work no creature, angels, or men, were able to undertake and perform; the priests under the law could not; men cannot save themselves, nor can any creature work out salvation for them: but Christ is able; as appears from the help his Father laid on him, who knew him to be mighty; from his own undertaking it, being mighty to save; and from his having completely effected it; and he must needs be able to do it, since he is the mighty God: and he is able to save to the uttermost; "to the utmost perfection", as the Arabic version renders it; so as nothing can be wanting in the salvation he is the author of, nor anything added to it; or "for ever", as the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Ethiopic versions render it; to the utmost of time, even to eternity, as well as to the utmost of men's wants: the persons he is able to save, are such

that come to God by him; Christ is able to save all the world, were it his will; but not his absolute power is designed by his ability, but that power which by his will is put into act; and reaches not to all men, for all are not saved; and those that are, are described by special characters, as here; they are such who come to God, not essentially considered, but personally, or in the person of the Father; and not as an absolute God, but as in Christ; not as on a throne of justice, but as on a throne of grace and mercy; not only as Christ's Father, but as theirs; and not only as the God of nature and providence, but as the God of grace: and this act of coming to him is a fruit of his everlasting love; an effect of Christ's death; is peculiar to regenerate persons; takes in the whole service of God, especially prayer; is not local but spiritual, it is by faith; and supposes spiritual life, and implies a sense of need, and of God's ability and willingness to help: the medium, or mean, by which such come to God, is Christ. Man had access to God in his state of innocence, but sinning, was not admitted; there is no approaching now unto him without a middle person; Christ is the Mediator, who having made peace, atoned for sin, satisfied justice, and brought in an everlasting righteousness, introduces his people into God's presence; in whom their persons and services are accepted, and through whom all blessings are communicated to them:

seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them; Christ ever lives as God, he is the living God; and though he died as man, he is risen from the dead, and will not die again, but live for evermore; and he lives as Mediator and Redeemer, and particularly as a priest; one branch of whose office it is to intercede for his people: this he does now in heaven; not by vocal prayer and supplication, at least not as in the days of his flesh; or as if he was supplicating an angry Judge; nor as controverting, or litigating, a point the court of heaven; but by the appearance of his person for them; by the presentation of his sacrifice, blood, and righteousness; by declaring his will, that such and such blessings be bestowed on such and such persons; and by recommending the prayers of his people, and removing the charges and accusations of Satan: the things he intercedes for are, the conversion of his that are in a state of nature; the consolation of distressed ones; fresh discoveries of pardoning grace to fallen believers; renewed strength to oppose sin, exercise grace, discharge duty, and bear up under temptations, and deliverance out of them; perseverance in faith and holiness, and eternal glorification; and he intercedes for these things; not for all the world, but for all the elect, even though transgressors; and he is very fit for this work, as the following verse shows; he is the one and only Mediator; and he is a very prevalent intercessor, he always succeeds; and he does this work readily, willingly, cheerfully, and freely; and all this proves him to be able to save; for though the impetration of salvation is by his death, the application of it is owing to his interceding life; had he died and not lived again, he could not have saved to the uttermost; his life is the security of his people's, and he lives for them, and as their representative; the blessed, effects of which they constantly enjoy.

Vincent's Word Studies
To the uttermost (εἰς τὸ παντελὲς)

Παντελής all complete, only here and Luke 13:11. Not perpetually, but perfectly.

Come unto God (προσερχομένους τῷ θεῷ)

The verb oP., and in this sense only in Hebrews and 1 Peter 2:4. See a peculiar usage in 1 Timothy 6:3. Comp. ἐγγίζειν to draw near, James 4:8; Hebrews 7:19.

To make intercession for them (εἰς τὸ ἐντυγχάνειν ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν)

The verb only here in Hebrews. Comp. ὑπερεντυγχάνειν, Romans 8:26, see note. See also on ἐντεύξεις supplications, 1 Timothy 2:1. The idea is not intercession, but intervention. It includes every form of Christ's identifying himself with human interests. The attempt has been made to trace this idea to Philo, who alludes to the λόγος ἱκέτης the supplicant Logos, and the λόγος παράκλητος the advocate-Logos. But the Logos is not treated by Philo as a divine-human personality intervening for men, but as a poetical personification allegorically considered. In one instance the suppliant Logos is the cry of the oppressed Israelites; in another, Moses, as the allegorical representative of the universal reason of mankind. It represents certain functions of human reason and speech. Again, the suppliant is the visible Cosmos striving to realize its ideal.

Geneva Study Bible
Wherefore he is {k} able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

(k) He is fit and sufficient.

People's New Testament
7:25 Wherefore he is able also to save. Because he is such a high priest, and hath the power of an endless life. He is not a frail mortal like us; and can save,

them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, in every extremity, all who approach God through his priesthood.

Wesley's Notes
7:25 Wherefore he is able to save to the uttermost - From all the guilt, power, root, and consequence of sin. Them who come - By faith. To God through him - As their priest. Seeing he ever liveth to make intercession - That is, he ever lives and intercedes. He died once; he intercedes perpetually.

King James Translators' Notes
to the...: or, evermore

Scofield Reference Notes
Margin save

See Scofield Note: "Rom 1:16".

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary
25. Wherefore-Greek, "Whence"; inasmuch as "He remaineth for ever."

also-as a natural consequence flowing from the last, at the same time a new and higher thing [Alford].

save-His very name Jesus (Heb 7:22) meaning Saviour.

to the uttermost-altogether, perfectly, so that nothing should be wanting afterwards for ever [Tittmann]. It means "in any wise," "utterly," in Lu 13:11.

come unto God-by faith.

by him-through Him as their mediating Priest, instead of through the Levitical priests.

seeing he ever liveth-resuming "He continueth ever," Heb 7:24; therefore "He is able to the uttermost"; He is not, like the Levitical priest, prevented by death, for "He ever liveth" (Heb 7:23).

to make intercession-There was but the one offering on earth once for all. But the intercession for us in the heavens (Heb 7:26) is ever continuing, whence the result follows, that we can never be separated from the love of God in Christ. He intercedes only for those who come unto God through Him, not for the unbelieving world (Joh 17:9). As samples of His intercession, compare the prophetical descriptions in the Old Testament. "By an humble omnipotency (for it was by His humiliation that He obtained all power), or omnipotent humility, appearing in the presence, and presenting His postulations at the throne of God" [Bishop Pearson]. He was not only the offering, but the priest who offered it. Therefore, He has become not only a sacrifice, but an intercessor; His intercession being founded on His voluntary offering of Himself without spot to God. We are not only then in virtue of His sacrifice forgiven, but in virtue of the intercession admitted to favor and grace [Archbishop Magee].

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary
7:11-25 The priesthood and law by which perfection could not come, are done away; a Priest is risen, and a dispensation now set up, by which true believers may be made perfect. That there is such a change is plain. The law which made the Levitical priesthood, showed that the priests were frail, dying creatures, not able to save their own lives, much less could they save the souls of those who came to them. But the High Priest of our profession holds his office by the power of endless life in himself; not only to keep himself alive, but to give spiritual and eternal life to all who rely upon his sacrifice and intercession. The better covenant, of which Jesus was the Surety, is not here contrasted with the covenant of works, by which every transgressor is shut up under the curse. It is distinguished from the Sinai covenant with Israel, and the legal dispensation under which the church so long remained. The better covenant brought the church and every believer into clearer light, more perfect liberty, and more abundant privileges. In the order of Aaron there was a multitude of priests, of high priests one after another; but in the priesthood of Christ there is only one and the same. This is the believer's safety and happiness, that this everlasting High Priest is able to save to the uttermost, in all times, in all cases. Surely then it becomes us to desire a spirituality and holiness, as much beyond those of the Old Testament believers, as our advantages exceed theirs.